The History of St. Patrick’s Day

The Harbinger

By Alexandra Reboredo

On March 17, people celebrate St. Patrick’s Day—the anniversary of Saint Patrick’s death. For over 1,000 years, the Irish have seen this day as a religious holiday, as Irish families traditionally attend church in the mornings and celebrate in the afternoon.

St. Patrick’s Day, which takes place during the Christian season of Lent, is usually heavily celebrated across the world. Lenten prohibitions, like the prohibitions of meat, were waived so that people can dance, drink, and eat traditional Irish foods—Irish bacon and cabbage.

The holiday is based off Saint Patrick, the apostle—Jesus’ disciple—of Ireland, who lived during the fifth century. Born in Roman Britain, Saint Patrick was captured and brought to Ireland as a slave at 16 years of age. Later, he escaped but returned to Ireland and was most well-known for bringing Christianity to its people.

Following his death, his mythology was ingrained into Irish culture…

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